Last edited by Tucage
Sunday, October 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Port-Orford-cedar root disease found in the catalog.

Port-Orford-cedar root disease

Lewis F. Roth

Port-Orford-cedar root disease

by Lewis F. Roth

  • 284 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Region in [Portland, OR] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cedar -- Diseases and pests -- Oregon.

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesPort Orford cedar root disease.
    Statement[by Lewis F. Roth, Robert D. Harvey, John T. Kliejunas].
    ContributionsHarvey, Robert D., Kliejunas, John T., United States. Forest Service. Pacific Northwest Region.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination[10] p. :
    Number of Pages10
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17565742M

    Phytophthora lateralis, an oomycete, causes Port‐Orford‐cedar root disease and is a major cause of mortality in the ecologically and economically important . Port Orford Cedar is a large, aromatic Cedar tree that is native to Oregon and California. It was first discovered near the city of Port Orford, Oregon and according to Wikipedia was introduced into cultivation in , by collectors working for the Lawson & Son nursery in Edinburgh, Scotland, after whom it was named as Lawson Cypress by the describing botanist Andrew .

    Plant Data Sheet. Species. Port Orford cedar, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (A. Murr.) Parl. Range. Very limited, covering about miles from north to south. In greatest abundance within 40 miles of the Pacific Ocean in southwestern Oregon and northwestern California, with patchy distribution farther inland. Phytophthora Root Disease of Port-Orford-cedar The pathogen that causes root disease in POC is Phytophthora lateralis. P. lateralis is an Oomycete or water-mold, which closely resembles fungi in its form. The name Phytophthora means "plant-destroyer" in .

    : Compendium of Conifer Diseases (Disease Compendium Series.) (): American Phytopathological Society, Everett M. Hansen, Littleleaf Disease, Port Orford Cedar Root Disease, Rhizina Root Disease, Leptographium Root Diseases of Conifers: Blackstain Root Disease, Other Leptographium Species on Conifer Roots. where Port-Orford-cedar grows best, scientists doubt that the disease threatens the biological survival of the species, because it regenerates quite ag- gressively. Rather, the fungus is ex-. s F pected to make the tree much rarer in mature forests. Description and Growth Mature Port-Orford-cedar trees fre-.


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Port-Orford-cedar root disease by Lewis F. Roth Download PDF EPUB FB2

Port-Orford-Cedar Root Disease Phytophthora lateralis Key Wildlife Value: Phytophthora lateralis creates all sizes of short-term snags and long lasting down wood by killing Port-Orford-cedar trees and weakening their root systems.

Port-Orford-cedar root disease book high proportion of the dead wood created by this pathogen occurs in riparian areas. Cause The fungus-like microorganisms Phytophthora lateralis and P.

cinnamomi kill Port-Orford-cedar seedlings and trees. The disease was found in nursery stock in and has since spread throughout the Pacific Northwest, in the tree's native range, southwest Oregon, and in landscapes with extensive hedgerows.

Port-Orford-cedar, Chamaecyparis lawsoniana (POC), is a valuable forest tree that has a limited distribution along the Pacific coast from southern Oregon to northern California. The species has highly aromatic wood and is widely used as a landscape plant. Port-Orford-cedar populations have been heavily damaged by a root disease caused by the exotic algal fungus Phytophthora.

This is an unusual disease in several ways. A non-native root disease; It kills and rots the phloem and cambium, not the wood; It is very host-specific, infecting only Port-Orford cedar. Port-Orford cedar has a very limited distribution on OR/CA border.

Important because the wood is. Additional Physical Format: Online version: Roth, Lewis F. Port-Orford-cedar root disease. [Portland, OR]: U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific.

Phytophthora lateralis is a soil-borne plant pathogen that causes cedar root disease in Lawson cypresses (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana) Port-Orford-cedar root disease book Northern pathogen was first noted to cause disease in around on nursery stock near Seattle.

Pacific yew (Taxus brevifolia) is also vulnerable to P. lateralis but less susceptible than Lawson cypress trees, and tree mortality Class: Oomycota. Infection. Ina root disease called Phytophthora lateralis was introduced into natural stands and has lead to significant mortality of this species throughout its range.

There are but a few remaining sub-watersheds that are currently uninfected. Phytophthora lateralis primarily spreads by spores in water coming into contact with the root system of Port-Orford-cedar.

Port Orford Cedar disease prevention AskedPM EDT I have three port orford cedars in my backyard, and I happen to. Port-Orford-cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana)—also known as white or Oregon-cedar, ginger-pine, or Lawson cypress—is widely known and recognized for its horticultural uses and the quality of its species name, lawsoniana, honors Charles Lawson (), the Edinburgh nurseryman who first introduced the species to horticulture.

There are five species of. where Port-Orford-cedar grows best, scientists doubt that the disease threatens the biological survival of the species, because it regenerates quite ag-gressively.

Rather, the fungus is ex-F pected to make the tree much rarer in mature forests. Description and Growth Mature Port-Orford-cedar trees fre-quently grow to diameters of 50 to 70Cited by: 1. Chamaecyparis lawsoniana, known as Port Orford cedar or Lawson cypress, is a species of conifer in the genus Chamaecyparis, family is native to Oregon and northwestern California, and grows from sea level up to 1, m (4, ft) in the valleys of the Klamath Mountains, often along : Tracheophytes.

COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle.

This fatal root disease has spread throughout much of the range of Port Orford cedar (Roth and others ). General Description. Port Orford white-cedar, also known as Oregon whote-cedar and Lawson cypress, is a large tree, to ft. in height and 4 to 6 ft.

in diameter (max. by 16 ft.), restricted to the coastal forests of. Port Orford Cedar disease. Asked FebruPM EST. My father is removing a big, old Port Orford cedar from his yard in the SW Portland Hills, because it (I think) has Port-Orford-cedar-root-disease.

I live in NE Portland and am converting my yard to Certified Backyard Habitat (per Columbia Land Trust guidelines). I need a nurse. Rot-resistant Port Orford cedars, a healthy houseplant diet Originally published Ma at am Updated Ma at am Chamaecyparis Lawsoniana ‘Blue Surprise’ with Author: Ciscoe Morris.

Port-Orford-Cedar Root Disease. The Port-Orford-cedar root disease causes the smaller roots of infected cedar trees to look darkened and watersoaked. The infected rootlets disintegrate rapidly.

The disease then progresses to nearby larger. Forest Insect & Disease Leaflet Revised August U.S. Department of Agriculture • Forest Service Port-Orford-Cedar Root Disease Frank Betlejewski1, Donald J. Goheen2, Peter A.

Angwin3, and Richard A. Sniezko4 1Interregional Port-Orford-cedar Program Manager, USDA Forest Service, Forest Health Protection, Pacific Northwest Region, Central Point, OR; 2Plant.

Port-Orford-cedar and Pc«t-Or1Œd-cedar Root Disease Locations The Powers Ranger District has the greatest concentration or POC in the world. Port Orford Cedar Root Disease Spreads to Louse Camp Area, Roads Closed in Bluff Creek Area; Bigfooters Beware.

The Hoopa newspaper, TWO RIVERS TRIBUNE, on November 3,Vol Is has just published an article about the Port Orford Cedar (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana) situation in the Fish Lake and Blue Lake areas just west and Author: Steven Streufert.

Douglas-fir Black Stain Root Disease (Leptographium wageneri var. pseudotsugae) Transparency % Port-Orford-Cedar Root Disease (Phytophthora lateralis) Transparency % Red Pine Scale (Matsucoccus resinosae) Close. Sulfur Dioxide ( Standard) EPA SO 2 non-attainment areas. Tallest Port Orford Cedar meters, ft.

and meters, ft. The bark of these Port Orford cedar can look like a few of the big younger redwoods, without deep furrows. The foliage difference may be hard to detect if the limbs start up high on the trunk.

This species can be damaged by a root disease caused by the fungal. Inhorticulturists began cultivating Port Orford cedar as an ornamental plant. It has since become a very popular landscape plant in both North America and Europe. Inhowever, ornamental Port Orford cedars in Seattle began dying from an introduced root fungus, which spread to native stocks in the early s.Managing Port-Orford-Cedar and the Introduced Pathogen Phytophthora lateralis Article (PDF Available) in Plant Disease 84(1) January with Reads How we measure 'reads'.